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The Resource Center Child Identity Theft & Protection | article

Avoid The Pitfalls Of Signing Your Child Up For Summer Activities

For many families, once school gets out, the days in the classroom are traded for days out on the courts or the ball field, as the nice weather permits kids to take advantage of organized sports that teach them lessons they can’t learn from books. From how to play on a team to the benefits of physical activity, the knowledge acquired by taking part in a sports league will help them grow into successful adults – not to mention keep them active and healthy instead of sitting in front of the TV or playing video games.

Whether you sign your son up for little league baseball or your daughter joins the local swim team, there are activities available in most communities for kids with a bevy of personalities and skills to take part in and ultimately enhance their abilities. However, you have to be careful that when you enlist your kid into a sports league, you aren’t signing them up for identity theft as well.

Children are far more likely to be victims than adults

According to a Carnegie Mellon Institute study on identity theft, children are almost 51 times more likely to fall victim to identity theft than their parents. This is for a number of reasons, but primarily because criminals want to take advantage of the clean credit report that a child’s Social Security number will grant them. Once a thief gets a hold of a child’s Social Security number, they have all the tools they’ll need to open up accounts without being rejected or dragged down by a bad credit score.

Only supply the necessary info – not their Social Security number

When you sign your kids up for recreational activities, you’ll likely be asked to provide the organization with a host of information about your child that the organization will claim is necessary for record keeping. While name, address and an emergency contact are usually appropriate requirements, if you are asked to provide your child’s Social Security number, to the league, don’t oblige them.

It’s not that the individuals running the league are themselves looking to steal your child’s identity, but putting this sensitive information on any document just increases your kid’s odds of becoming a victim. A Social Security number is not necessary for anything that these groups will need to make sure your kid is safe, and isn’t a requirement to receive medical attention. While joining organized sports can be beneficial in a lot of ways for your kids, don’t put their identity in harms way when you sign them up.

Avoid The Pitfalls Of Signing Your Child Up For Summer Activities

For many families, once school gets out, the days in the classroom are traded for days out on the courts or the ball field, as the nice weather permits kids to take advantage of organized sports that teach them lessons they can’t learn from books. From how to play on a team to the benefits of physical activity, the knowledge acquired by taking part in a sports league will help them grow into successful adults – not to mention keep them active and healthy instead of sitting in front of the TV or playing video games.

Whether you sign your son up for little league baseball or your daughter joins the local swim team, there are activities available in most communities for kids with a bevy of personalities and skills to take part in and ultimately enhance their abilities. However, you have to be careful that when you enlist your kid into a sports league, you aren’t signing them up for identity theft as well.

Children are far more likely to be victims than adults

According to a Carnegie Mellon Institute study on identity theft, children are almost 51 times more likely to fall victim to identity theft than their parents. This is for a number of reasons, but primarily because criminals want to take advantage of the clean credit report that a child’s Social Security number will grant them. Once a thief gets a hold of a child’s Social Security number, they have all the tools they’ll need to open up accounts without being rejected or dragged down by a bad credit score.

Only supply the necessary info – not their Social Security number

When you sign your kids up for recreational activities, you’ll likely be asked to provide the organization with a host of information about your child that the organization will claim is necessary for record keeping. While name, address and an emergency contact are usually appropriate requirements, if you are asked to provide your child’s Social Security number, to the league, don’t oblige them.

It’s not that the individuals running the league are themselves looking to steal your child’s identity, but putting this sensitive information on any document just increases your kid’s odds of becoming a victim. A Social Security number is not necessary for anything that these groups will need to make sure your kid is safe, and isn’t a requirement to receive medical attention. While joining organized sports can be beneficial in a lot of ways for your kids, don’t put their identity in harms way when you sign them up.

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