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The Resource Center Identity Theft & Protection | article

ID theft and the workplace

Ideally, you should feel comfortably in your work environment knowing that there are measures in place to help protect you from identity theft. However, even if your bosses have promised that they are doing all they can to enforce cyber security on work networks and secure the office after hours, there are still plenty of opportunities for ID theft that no one can guarantee against, especially your employer.

Consider all of the sensitive information your employer has on you that could potentially be used to commit fraud using your identity should it fall into the wrong hands.

  • If you have direct deposit, your company will need a blank copy of one of your checks to establish the payment process. Some businesses will keep this document on file, while others will return it to you once the direct deposit has been set up – which is what you should request. However, even if they don’t have a hard copy of your check, your account information is still visible on the company’s payroll system, and a disgruntled employee with access could easily commit ID theft using it, draining your account.
  • A copy of your Social Security card is almost always kept on file in the office too. If this is a digital copy, it would be stored on a computer database, while a physical copy could be in a file cabinet somewhere on the premises. There are people with access to these locations that you may not even know about. Worst of all, sophisticated hackers may easily be able to find their way onto computer networks and commit identity theft using this information.

Verify with your boss where these documents will be once you hand them over and look into any past history of ID theft that may have taken place at the company. If your employer can’t verify they are doing all they can to protect you, it may be time to look for a job elsewhere.

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